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enemy america has -- at is our first president, george washington. >> i think george washington said this when he was up in massachusetts in the beginning of december 1775 or maybe late november. communications were slow in these days. washington, in the point in time, probably the most recent things he knew about done more -- about dunmore was probably as close to the peak of his power in virginia because ultimately he was chased out of virginia. but during the summer and fall of 1775, he was very effective in sending out troops to read plantations. -- to read plantations. he was during of the indians. they could find refuge and get the fleet of the british army. even stirred up the instruction of indentured servants. not only did look like he might succeed, but there were rumors that he would ascend the party in the area of alexandria, va irginia. george washington is up there in massachusetts were about his wife. even thomas jefferson were about his wife at the same time. and i put that in. i did not dwell on it. i think it is a footnote or something like that. but washington had
was afraid if they could not hold america, the dominoes will fall elsewhere in the british empire. he was wrong about that and he was wrong about a lot. he was a bad decision maker for the british government in the early years. but to blame it all on him would be a great mistake. >> what is your take on the 16 points that were made by thomas jefferson in the virginia constitution and therefore the declaration of independence? >> that is all this stuff about george iii being an ogre and being responsible for everything. that was dressed up for very good reason. if you were urging a revolution, and by political theory of the era, you could overthrow a tyrant. overthrowing a tyrant was ok, it was not a civil war. it was something that had greater justification. in order to make the case they needed heading into the period of wanting to be credible to the other nations so they could gain from france or spain, and this was another reason for the declaration of independence, you had to make george iii out to be a tyrant. sonya, with all these arguments about what he did. that is where tempe
countries is stamped "made in america" and that's something to be proud of. something to be proud of. [cheers and applause] by the way, i hope the camera folks had a chance to take a look at some of the connects including that flag made out of connects and joe biden was in costco, he wanted to buy some of this stuff but i told him he had too much work to do. i wasn't going to have him building rollercoasters all day long. of course, santa delivers everywhere. i have been keeping my own naughty and nice list for washington. so you should keep your eye on who gets some connects this year. they're going to be some members of congress who get them and some who don't. [applause] this is a wonderful time of year. it's been a few weeks since a long election finally came to an end and obviously i couldn't be more honored to be back in the white house, but i'm already missing the time that i spent on the campaign visiting towns like this and talking to folks like you. >> we love you! >> i love you back. [cheers and applause] the benefits of traveling and getting out of the white house is it g
not hold america, the dominoes will fall in the rest of the british empire. he was a bad decision maker for the british government in the early years. to blame it all on him would be a mistake. >> what is your take on the 16 points that were made by thomas jefferson in the virginia constitution and then the declaration of independence? >> all that stuff about george iii being an ogre and responsible for everything, if your urging a revolution, by political theory, you could overthrow retired. -- a tyrant. overthrowing a tyrant would be a good thing. in order to make the case they needed heading into wanting to be credible to the other nations, such as france or spain whatever, you had to make george iii out to be a tyrant. so he came up with all of these arguments about what he did and that is with jefferson did. >> what did you think? >> i was not a big jeffersonian after i did all of this. he was a wordsmith. he was not a good executive when he was governor of virginia. he was not able to organize effective resistance. he wasn't famous until he was famous in the sense that we know his
-term investments here. at the same time, we do not start of what has been so much a part of america's -- do not starve so much of what has been a part of america's history, our willingness to invest in the future, and that includes children, poor children, modern infrastructure, basic and blue sky research. when we get beyond the challenge we face over these next few weeks, i think that is going to be a broader challenge we face over the next decade. >> i think we have time for one more question. over here. as the question is coming, i want to say how much we support the president in this fight on ensuring the balance, and the president has been very strong on that issue. >> richard singer. we are a biomedical company that helps nurses and doctors, may collaborate better with social media. we got a small amount of the innovation funding, but it is a broader question about the health care ecosystem. if the company goes under, all the software engineers get new jobs in a matter of weeks. but in biotech, we have a lot of people with ph.d.s, longer-term and specialized types of areas, and we do
that everybody could relate to and so she'd become one of america's most celebrated a beloved authors in the silent spring turned a very different direction. "silent spring" is a disturbing book, a worrisome book to point that what we were doing to ourselves by the careless use of pesticides in many different places. since it's not 1962 anymore, i thought i would explain more for you about who rachel carson was. she was born in 1907 in the house in springfield, pennsylvania. when a person was born in the upstairs bedroom of the house, at the time did not have the addition on the brick inside. very simple, very modest house, four runs. two downstairs and two bedrooms upstairs. there is no central heat, no indoor plumbing. data couple of couple of outhouses out that. a shed in the front of vacation i kept it worse and there was a little bit out of the west.??? there is enough property around the house that carson could explore the woods, often with her mother as a child and she looked birds and animals and was fascinated from a very early age. she was a gifted student and a talented
to change anything. they do not want to help america. what people are they for? the people have spoken, but they do not ever listen to the people. what people are the working for? host: james in new york as a deadline for independents. caller: i just want to point out something. 400% to 1000% increase in salaries versus the workers for the so-called job creators, along the way, the people are not making these increases in salaries. they talk about cutting taxes on the wealthy. well, what about giving money -- a fair percentage of an increase to the people that are doing the work? i never hear anything about that. it just seems to me that the unfairness starts there. host: that is james and new york. the lead story in this morning's boston globe with the headline "modest hope." [video clip] >> i just had a good and constructive discussion with senate and house leadership about how to prevent the tax hike on the middle class. i am optimistic that we may be able to reach an agreement that can pass both houses of in time. senators harry reid and mitch mcconnell are working on such an agree
: sorry, america. less than 24 hours to go but no deal on the fiscal cliff. why can't lawmakers get it together? we'll ask a master negotiator, donald trump, what is happening in this process in moments. >> clayton: and say good-bye to 2012. we are live in times square with the man in charge of putting on the biggest show of the year. "fox & friends" hour two begins right now. ♪ i'll never ever get back together ♪ ♪ . >> juliet: oh, in honor of dave briggs, this is his last day with us. he's moving on to different pastures. >> clayton: so play his least favorite song? i asked you to send us your least favorite song. that's dave's. mine is "call me maybe". and toba knows it's my birthday. please do not play that song today. that's my only wish. >> juliet: i can't wait to hear "call me maybe." how do you guys not like that? i don't get it. let's get to some headlines. major health scare for secretary of state hillary clinton. she was supposed to be back on the job this week, but instead, she is waking up at new york presbyterian hospital. she's being treated for a blood closet i
've been hearing about these things. he broke into the woman's home and drove her to the bank of america branch where she worked. she triggered an alarm and the suspect escaped. it took them three hours to remove the device from her neck, she was not hurt. how scary is that. and a newspaper taking heat for publishing names and addresses of gun owners and they're not stop at that, the online maps, list of all people in westchester and rocklands county, in putnam county, the paper claims, but they say, uh-uh, privacy. and dozens of people try to find out and then find themselves in need of a rescue. >> somebody get a branch. >> oh, oh! so you could see one after another, they all start falling into the water. oh, within seconds of each other and chain reaction continuing as more people tried to help out. took ten minutes and luckily people on shore were able to pull everybody out and we can smile about it now because everybody was okay. >> because i was laughing. >> it's pretty comical watching na. look, you can see that ice is thin. don't go out on that. use your head, people. >> clayton:
across america? this is the reality we face? . we sent the bill to him that will protect 98% of american families and he will not call it on the floor. is he waiting for what is going to happen january 1 when consumer confidence is shaken across america, as everyone sees an increase in income-tax rates, including working families because he will not act? is he waiting for the doctors, as of january 1, the reimbursement for doctors goes down 20% -- 27%. is he waiting for that to happen or is he waiting his election to speaker? i hope it is not that. i hope he understands putting this off is not fair to america and is not been for the recovery. it will hurt us as we wait. there is no excuse. there is solid support among republicans and independents and democrats to make sure we protect working families and move forward. now the house is going home again. i do not know what we can accomplish but we certainly have depending on the floor major things that will help america. >> thank you. some other unfinished business, you have all seen on the tv screens the devastation. i have seen storms an
at the white house with just four days left until the deadline. >> they called him stormin norman. america remembering general norman schwarzkopf. >> and have gun, will teach. hundreds of educators get a hands-on lesson in firearms. controversial proposal. good morning. welcome to "early start." 5:00 a.m. in the east. >>> it is the last friday of 2012. i've just had that pointed out to us. one final desperate attempt to dodge the fiscal cliff, just four days left before we go over the edge triggers tax hikes, spending cuts that could send the nation back into recession. the president calling for members of the congress the back. a gang of six attending. vice president biden, harry reid, house minority leader nancy pelosi, mitch mcconnell and john boehner representing the republicans. brianna keilar is live from washington. is anybody optimistic that a deal could be done today around a table? >> i will tell you the optimism is sort of sinking. senate majority leader harry reid said he doesn't see how it can get done by january 1st. we heard from president obama before he left from his vacat
months. america's gift headquarters. walmart. military families face, we understand. at usaa, we know military life is different. we've been there. that's why every bit of financial advice we offer is geared specifically to current and former military members and their families. [ laughs ] dad! dad! [ applause ] ♪ [ male announcer ] life brings obstacles. usaa brings advice. call or visit us online. we're ready to help. inspiration. great power. iconic design. exhilarating performance. [ race announcer ] audi once again has created le mans history! [ male announcer ] and once in a great while... all of the above. take your seat in the incomparable audi a8. take advantage of exceptional values on the audi a8 during the season of audi event. ♪ >>> time for some sports now. peyton manning and the broncos looking for their eighth straight win last night against the raiders. first quarter in oakland, peyton manning drops back and connects with joel dreessen for the score. broncos take an early 7-0 lead. raiders down by nine in the third quarter. carson palmer trying to convert
, latin america. four out of the top eight markets of the world, when you asked, do i care what i look like, latin america. the market for tupperware products in latin america, $1 billion, $22 billion in cosmetics. >> how are you going up against the competitor? because most people think avon as the vehicle for cosmetics. >> all of our latin american businesses are way up. they're up double digits. we're pleased with what's happening there. >> okay, rick, huge in france. we know french economy not that good. women want to make some money during this period. france is strong for you. >> we've grown, almost doubled the company in the last five years in france. we're the biggest company of our kind in france. we're the largest seller of cookbooks in france. we had some issues the first two quarters, during the election, as you know, most of the consumers sat on the sidelines. we're starting to see it come back to life again. so we feel very good about france. ditto germany. >> isn't that incredible. >> rick, 52-week high when compared to avon. incredible. thank you so much for joining us.
impact of latino generation. panelists include former white house advisor to latin -- latin america, executive director of the latino partnership for conservative principles, and arizona state university professor rodolfo espinoza. this event is two hours. >> good morning. we will go ahead and get started. welcome to the wilson center. this is, as you well know, a place where public policy and a research me to bring together the world of ideas with your world a policy action. very happy to have our director of the latin-american program. and of course, very pleased that this is an event we are co- sponsoring with immigration works that did most of the work for this. the president of emigration works really put the panel together, as well as very proud to co-concert arizona university. i want to acknowledge a senior scholar at the woodrow wilson center. and many other good friends here. good to see dan and rubber co and many others at the woodrow wilson center. there is no doubt the latino vote was important past election. we did not know how important this would be when we started t
americas one of the most famous apt slavery advocate. famous as a radical ab list in nist. he was perceived to be that way because of a series of features he had given. lincoln on the other hand because he didn't have a national record could convincingly portray himself as the least radical the least antislavery republican. who is up for the race. so they go in and sue ward doesn't just have the advantage of being the dominant republican and being the governor and senator from new york. he also have -- weed is the name. fan fastic name. it's like tom wolf. perfectly portrays hawaii, you know, nature. he's the fine -- mid 19th merge has to offer he has essentially financial resources in the darings when table could involve cash as well as anything else you imagine. that doesn't happen. of course not. enormous advantages. he's been to many conventions. he dominated most. he goes there in fact sue ward was not the republican nominee in 1856 they told him there was no way we were winning. you don't want to be the leader of losing cost. let's wait four years and we'll win. he read the politics r
be the biggest concern for the united states of america, if it spreads across boundaries and al qaeda of the islamic maghreb will be a continuing problem throughout africa. thank you very much. >> senator isakson i'm always thankful for your partnership and the way our staffs work together for these hearings. forgive us, it is past left vending our appointed hour. all your testimony, your written testimony will be submitted for the record. there were several or the senators who expressed real interest in this hearing today but due to their sqed us were unable to join us. i will leave the record open for a week which will allow senators to address questions to any of our witnesses and take some actions going forward. i'm grateful for the support of efforts that made it possible for us to get a grateful discussion of many challenging issues facing the united states in the region and in mali. thanks for joining us. dr. dr. fomunyoh and miss dufka and thank you for your testimony today. we're grateful for your testimony and with that this hearing is adjourned. >> the labor department toda
Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16